Young Fisherman Effortlessly Catches Fish With This Genius Power Drill Trick!

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Fishing is a great way to get out in nature, relax, and hopefully catch a fish or two. But the constant reeling in and out, especially if you’re using a spinner, can get a little monotonous. And when you do land a fish, you’re battling to reel that thing in with a lot of tension on your arm and hand. Maybe this guy was thinking the same thing and thought there might be an easier, funner way to fish. So what he decided to do was think outside of the box and motorize his reel with a power drill.

Young Fisherman Effortlessly Catches Fish With This Genius Power Drill Trick!

The First Fishing Poles

Could this powered fishing reel catch on and be the next development in the history of fishing poles? Only time will tell. Of course, the first fishing rods were nothing more than wood attached to some string with some kind of hook attached to the end. Interestingly, there’s a 4th century account of a Chinese fishing rod that was made of bamboo attached to a silk line and a hook fashioned from a needle. And they actually used rice for bait. Who knew that fish like the taste of rice?

Another ancient predecessor to the fish hooks of today was known as a gorge, which was a piece of bone, wood, or stone about an inch long and pointed at both ends. The gorge, which was attached to a line, would be covered with bait. Then when a fish swallowed it, a quick pull would sink the gorge into the fish’s mouth.

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Modern Improvements to the Fishing Pole

The Industrial Revolution brought about many improvements, and one of them was to the fishing pole. With textile spinning machines, a variety of fishing lines could be made quickly. Rods also began to be fashioned from wood that was lighter in weight than traditional rods. Later, in 1918, the first steel rod was introduced. The problem was, though, that they were too heavy for most fishermen’s liking. But in the 1940s, the fiberglass rod came along, followed by boron and graphite rods in the early 60s.

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