Sleeping Fisherman Gets Pulled Off Dock by Fish

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If you’ve done a lot of bait fishing, chances are you’ve nodded off here and there while waiting for a fish to bite. Maybe you’ve even had the noise of the unraveling line on your reel wake you up. Well, that’s kind of what happened to this guy, but he got a much ruder awakening as a big fish pulled his pole and him with it off the peer and down into the lake while he was taking a nap. That can’t feel good when all of the sudden you are underneath the surface with water going through your mouth and nose. This fisherman, though, is able to recover and not lose his pole or the fish in the process.

Sleeping Fisherman Gets Pulled Off Dock by Fish

The Red Neck Tarpon

After he gets his head out of the water and gets his wits about him, you’ll here the angler say that he has a red neck tarpon on the other end of his line. This doesn’t mean it’s an actual tarpon—it’s just a red neck term for carp. Tarpon is a highly sought-after saltwater trophy fish that’s found in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans. These fish can be anywhere from 4 to 8 feet long and weight up to 280 pounds. Along with broad mouths, they have large eyes and silvery scales and stripes covering their body. Tarpons usually aren’t caught to eat, as they are a bony fish and their meat isn’t very satisfying. Fisherman the world over are attracted to them, however, because they’re known to put up a good fight and jump high out of the water. The same definitely can’t be said for carp.

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The Bugle Mouth Bass

We can also hear the fisherman call the carp by another name as well—a bugle mouth bass. This can be a little confusing as he says this and the other name, but bugle mouth bass is yet another red neck term for carp. There are several different species of bass, but the two most popular bass game fish are smallmouth and largemouth bass. The largemouth bass is characterized by its prominent lower jaw and olive-green color. Like the tarpon, the largemouth bass is sought after by anglers because of the fight it puts up when hooked. The largest one ever caught was 25 feet, 1 inch. Similarly, the smallmouth bass is known for putting up a fight as well and is more likely to jump out of the water than a largemouth bass. Smallmouth bass are typically brown, but they can sometimes be black or green. The current world record for a smallmouth bass catch is 11 pounds, 15 ounces.

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