Crane Operator Crushes Clients House Trying to Place New Swimming Pool in Backyard

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Well, you can’t help but feel sorry for the guy who owns this house. He went from the excitement of having a pool installed in his backyard to the devastation of what happens next. The elements you have here are a pool, a big crane, and the home. It doesn’t take a genius to know that once you get a load out too far away from the base of a crane, bad things can happen. Like so many things in life, taking the right precautions could have prevented it.

Crane Operator Crushes Clients House Trying to Place New Swimming Pool in Backyard

The New Swimming Pool Being Installed

Who wouldn’t want to have a continuous motion pool in their backyard? These pools are more compact and therefore more affordable to heat, and they’re one of the best forms of exercise you can get. The one here looks to be around 20 feet long, 10 feet high, and 10 feet wide. Those dimensions would make it quite heavy, and maybe the crane operator underestimated the weight or just didn’t realize it. The cheapest continuous motion pools are just under $10,000, but this one probably costs a few thousand more than that. If you’ve ever looked at regular pools, you’ll know that the average is over $20,000, so you stand to save a little with a continuous motion pool–if you can get it installed without damaging anything, that is.

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The Crane Lifting the Pool

This truck-mounted crane is pretty heavy-duty, but that doesn’t mean you can just lift anything up and extend it as far as you want to go. The crane operator should have consulted his crane load chart before performing this task. Knowing a crane’s load capacity and how that changes based on distance and angle is critical. Here are the key things one of these charts will tell you:

  • Lift Capacity – Take caution with this number because the maximum lift capacity means the most the crane can handle with the shortest lift with the outriggers extended fully.
  • Lift Angle – This is the maximum lift if a fixed or luffing jib is used. A higher angle lowers the lift capacity.
  • Lift Range – This number tells you how long the boom needs to be to lift a load at a given height and distance.
  • Dimensions and Weight – Also critical information that’s pretty much self-explanatory
  • Crane in Motion – This shows the maximum weight a crane can pick up and carry, as well as the weight that can be supported by moving and other capacities.

On top of consulting these charts, OSHA has guidelines for crane, derrick, and hoist safety that should have been considered here too.

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